was successfully added to your cart.
Category

Training

How to improve your dog’s recall

By | Training | No Comments

Stopping an errant dog and getting it to come back is one of the biggest challenges of gundog training. Losing control of your dog can not only be embarrassing but it can cause harm to any game animals it’s chasing, and can even put your dog’s life in danger.

It doesn’t take a dog long to learn that they can outrun you, and their basic hunting instincts are incredibly strong, so it can be extremely useful to have the following recall tricks up your sleeve:

Start early

It’s a fact that dogs learn more in their first sixteen weeks than the rest of their life. It is at this time that they are at their most receptive, soaking up information and experiences like sponges so it is important during this stage that they learn their own name. Learning tends to be permanent when taught at this age, but if that time has passed don’t worry, not all is lost!

Use a lead to start basic training

When you first start lead training, it is important to start in an enclosed space as this will give your dog enough freedom to learn and yet keeps you firmly in control. As the dog gains understanding of what you’re asking, you can allow it more and more freedom. Cues and rewards help with this training, and details of each are listed below.

Use loud hearing cues such as a whistle

There are some obvious benefits to using a dog whistle for dog recall. For one, whistle sounds travel much further than that of the human voice, especially on windy days and they don’t show emotion or panic, unlike the human voice. It also provides consistency when helping your dog to learn.

Reward good behaviour

The best way to your dog’s heart is through its stomach, and giving them high-value treats shows them that they’ve done a good job. However, all dogs are different and whilst most dogs would take a food based treat as a reward, others may prefer to be rewarded in another way e.g. by playing with a ball.

Never punish bad behaviour

It can be very frustrating to lose control of your dog, but any punishment upon their (eventual) return could be very confusing. The last thing you want to do is give you dog fewer reasons to return, so always reward a dog when it recalls successfully. Keep enforcing that positive behaviour.

TRAINING CLASS TEST RESULTS 18th September 2016

By | Results, Training | No Comments

Prize-line-upUNITED RETRIEVER CLUB
North Midland Area
TRAINING CLASS TEST RESULTS
18th September 2016

The Training Class Test brought the season of training on dummies to a close, ready for dogs and handlers to move on to picking game in the shooting field. Mr Robert Bower again invited us to Manor Farm, Carburton, Notts where we had varied ground for judges David Bellamy and Anna Wagland to test the dogs. As is usual this test is unclassified and divided into three separate classes. The day was sunny and pleasant, and the undulating ground included pasture, a block of maize, and mixed woodland dissected by rides. Three different breeds took part in a friendly atmosphere, with the tests designed to reflect the different stages of training for the three classes.
The awards and prizes of Alpha dog food were presented by our host Robert Bower and the awards were as follows:

Results:-
PUPPY & BEGINNERS
1st. Mandy Minshall’s Lab d “Connor”

NOVICE
1st. Nessa Thompson@s Lab d “Pepsi”
2nd. Paul Williams’ GR d “Macy”
3rd. Caroline Hewison’s FCR d “Reef”
4th. Marlene Dobson’s Lab d “Spice”
CoM. Cherry Wood’s FCR d “Raven”
cake
OPEN
1st. Christina Robinson’s Lab d “Eddy”
2nd. Phil Robinson’s Lab d “Quin”
3rd. Terry Dobson’s Lab d “Brigadier”
4th. Nessa Thompson’s GR d “Willow”
CoMs: Polly Morten’s Lab d “George”
Mandy Minshall’s Lab d “Flynn”