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Monthly Archives

October 2019

How to train your gundog to hunt using a whistle

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dog trainingDogs can often be sly and stubborn when receiving instructions. If you are experiencing problems with selective hearing or other obstinate behaviours, then a whistle could be the next level tool your routine requires.

A dog whistle can help you train your dog by reaffirming positive behaviour at the exact second they do something correctly.

A wide range of everyday dog whistles are available on the market and are helpful for training commands and discipline over both short and long distances. In fact, the sound of a whistle can travel much further than a voice.

A whistle is small and flexible enough to be conveniently carried everywhere you go. Should your dog wander away when you’re looking in another direction, a simple blow of your whistle will beckon her back.

Here is our guide to getting the most from your whistle training:

Tip one

As soon as your dog starts to fail at responding to commands, bring out the whistle. As soon as their response is positive, reward them with a treat and plenty of praise. This reaffirms that the whistle sound is a positive one.

Tip two

Use different cues for different pitches, for example, a short, sharp whistle could mean sit, while a long one says fetch. You can also alter the tone of the whistle to suit different commands.

Tip three

Remain consistent with your commands so that your dog will always know what you expect of it.

Tip four

Use words until your dog responds on command and then reward it with a treat. Your dog will eventually be able to read the whistle cue and then you can drop the verbal command altogether.

Tip five

Repeat, repeat and repeat some more. Multiple training sessions are necessary until your dog responds without receiving a treat.

Tip six

Use your whistle for multiple situations. Whistles can prove useful in different situations, such as breaking up a fight and calling your dog back to your side too.

Tip seven

Think of your whistle as your voice, or as a shared language between you. Unfortunately, we can’t have a conversation with our dog, but whistle commands come pretty close.

Choosing the perfect gundog for you

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Spending time with your gundog, training together and appreciating your time out in the field is one of the great joys of working together. Selecting the right gundog for you is a crucial decision because finding the perfect dog will make for many exceptional and memorable days.

The first question to ask yourself is: what kind of work will your gundog be doing? Different dogs are better suited to different roles.

Dogs such as terriers specialise in the control of pests. The Jack Russell, for example, is famous for their rat-catching abilities. Whereas Springers excel in the art of hunting. Alternatively, breeds such as Alsatians and Border Collies can make excellent dogs for beating.

Let’s find out a little more about each working breed.

Spaniels

Hunting is a spaniel’s primary job, and his strongest instinct. Traditionally, he has to hunt up and flush game within proximity of his handler. The moment the game is shot, he must stop and then retrieve on command.

Hunting at a remarkably fast pace, the Spaniel flits from side to side in front of his handler, covering a tremendous amount of ground. However, the fantastic ability to work in this manner comes with a price, he is a live-wire of a dog, particularly when young, and may prove a restless housemate. Harnessing that incredible energy requires a trainer with great ability.

Retrievers

The Retriever, despite the distractions around him, remains unwaveringly steady and only leaves the handler’s side when commanded to do so. Possessing great patience, the Retriever awaits commands while also accurately marking any shot game. He is prepared to face lengthy and complicated retrieves.

He calls on his experience and initiative, and is incredibly responsive to his handler’s every command, even at great distances.

Setters and Pointers

The role of the Pointer or Setter is to find game, when scarce in open countryside. He should then point to it, enabling the handler to advance within gunshot before the flush.

The pointing breeds are impressive and athletic dogs. These powerful creatures require large open spaces in which to run and vast amounts of exercise.

HPRs or Versatile Gundogs

The HPR is a multi-faceted dog that is becoming increasingly popular. There is an extensive range of breeds from which to choose, each with their unique working style and personalities.

At this moment in time, however, they’re still a minority in the shooting field, so specialists in their training are hard to find.

Putting in the research before you choose your field companion will be hugely beneficial to your future.