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Annabell Dennis

Caring for your working ferret

By | Alpha Feeds | No Comments

The care that working ferrets need comes in two forms, physical and mental. As very intelligent animals, they need a secure place to live and lots of mental and physical activity to stop them from getting bored.

Ferrets are exceptionally clean animals which means their living quarters should be cleaned regularly. Because of their tendency to dig, their cage, hutch or court should be kept as secure as possible too.

Living quarters – Inside or outside?

Ferrets are happy both inside and outside. Keeping them inside is a great way to build a bond, especially if you have a lone working ferret. However, if you have multiple ferrets, an outside hutch or purpose-built court with a concrete floor might be the best way to ensure your ferrets can’t escape, or get places they shouldn’t. If building your own court, it should be high enough for you to stand up in.

Feeding and nutrition

Ferrets, like most animals have their own specific dietary requirements. They are obligate carnivores and their good health depends on the quality of their diet. They have such a rapid metabolism and wake up to eat about every four hours. Fresh water and food should always be readily available for them.

Ferrets require a concentrated diet to receive all the calories and nutrients they need to stay fit and healthy as they never eat huge amounts in one go. A ferret’s diet should be high in protein and energy, and low in fibre.

Exercise and play

Putting a short length of drain pipe in the hutch is a good idea to encourage ferrets to go into dark holes. Remember to never force them in, or they may develop a fear.

Ferrets need plenty of variety and stimulation to prevent them from getting bored. They love playing with small balls and tubes that can be used as tunnels too. There are many accessories out on the market but, if you are creative, you can make your own versions using household items or items from the shed.

Handling and care

When handling your ferret it is important to make sure they feel comfortable and secure. It is best to hold them under their front legs. It is also important to check your ferrets’ claws regularly as the front claws grow very quickly. Your ferret will probably not get much chance to wear them down by digging, so it is up to you to clip their claws.

What other jobs are working dogs used for?

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Jobs for working dogs have changed dramatically over the centuries. Their roles began with all sorts of simple, practical tasks, such as helping their human companions with hunting, fishing, herding and farming. More recently, dogs have been set tasks and jobs that majorly help humans, often changing their lives for the better or even saving lives.

Health and Social Care:

From assisting people with disabilities to guiding the visually impaired and detecting life-threatening diseases at early stages, these are just a few ways our canine companions work to save lives every day. Germans shepherds are the most commonly used breeds as they are particularly skilled when it comes to detection.

How do dogs detect diseases?

Dogs can identify tiny odour concentrations of around one per part trillion. That’s the equivalent of one spoon of sugar in two Olympic-sized swimming pools. This is how dogs are able to detect even minor changes in human odour that are often triggered by a medical issue.

Diabetes:

The majority of Medical Alert Assistance Dogs are used to detect diabetes. Trained to detect minute changes in blood sugar levels, when these levels fall or rise outside the normal range the dogs will warn their owner, get help and fetch any vital medical supplies.

Nut allergies:

Other Medical Alert Assistance Dogs are trained to detect the air-borne allergens in an environment, and then alert their client to the dangerous trigger.

Cancer:

Medical detection dogs are carrying out an NHS ethically approved study with their ability to detect urological cancers using their sense of smell. They have the ability to detect breast cancer and the potential to detect other cancers such as lung and colorectal cancers.

Conservation Dogs:

Recently, conservation dogs have been working to detect endangered species which have a low detection probability, such as great crested newts. Being a protected species, their disturbance or destruction is illegal.

How dogs help:

Clearing areas of protected and endangered species can be costly and time consuming. Working closely with the construction industry and ecologists, specially trained detection dogs can make this process quicker, more efficient and more cost effective.

Detecting Harmful/Rare Substances:

German shepherds and the Malinois are particularly skilled when it comes to sniffing out and detecting alcohol, drugs and firearms. These skills also come in handy when it comes to looking for something hidden as their noses can lead us to places that we would struggle to find otherwise.

Training:

It’s important to note that working dogs take a lot of training in order to follow directions, even if they are simply doing what comes naturally to them.

Breeds that are bred to be working dogs require a lot of patience and training. They also require much more mental and physical stimulation than other breeds, but the things they can achieve with the right training are incredible.

For information on our range of working dog food and your local stockists, click here or get in touch with us on +44(0) 844 800 2234.

Spotlight on a working dog breed: Border Collie

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A Border Collie is not only a very popular working dog breed, it’s also the 12th most popular breed of all dogs and it’s not hard to see why.

Not only are they exceptionally easy to train, highly intelligent and don’t shed much compared to some dogs, but they are also known to be great around children and other animals.

Fact file:

  • Lifespan – 10 – 14 years
  • Height – Males 48 – 56 cm, Females 46 – 53 cm
  • Weight – Males 14 – 20 kg, Females 12 – 19 kg
  • Pedigree Breed – Yes – KC Recognised in the Pastoral Group

Most intelligent breed

Their intelligence is really what sets them apart from other breeds in this field.

They rank at number one for intelligence, out of seventy-nine other breeds and are known to be the best herding dog on the planet. For generations, the Border Collie has worked alongside shepherds and love being outside, challenged and exercised.

Once trained, Collies rarely get it wrong and when they focus on an owner or handler, it is usually very hard to break the dog’s focus.

Movement

Border Collies are very energetic, moving freely and smoothly with the minimum of effort. This gives them the accurate appearance of both speed and stealth, especially when herding.

They are incredibly agile dogs, winning many canine sporting activities for their agility skills.

Temperament

As history shows, Collies boast an extremely strong instinct to work alongside man, always ready and alert to any commands they are given. They are patient too, and are good with authority, children and other animals.

Working dog roles

Not only do these dogs work to herd flocks of sheep, but they are a popular choice for search and rescue dogs, as well as tracker and sniffer dogs too.

Pack mentality

Border Collies tend to form a very strong bond with one person in particular. They will always be friendly and affectionate to the rest of the household too.

Prey drive

Herding is a trait that’s deeply embedded in a Collie’s psyche. They have a high prey drive and will chase an animal whether large or small, not necessarily to hurt it, but because they feel the need to. It is important that each Collie understands the “recall” command, and will obey it in an instant, otherwise it’s not wise to let one loose around livestock.

For any more information on our range of working dog food and your local stockists, click here or get in touch with us on +44(0) 844 800 2234.

How to cope with puppy’s first night at home

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In the stressful experience of suddenly being surrounded by a new environment and by new people, it’s important to make your puppy feel safe, welcome and comfortable in their new home.

Reduce changes where possible

Even if you plan on changing your puppy’s diet further down the line, it is important not to make too many changes at once. Familiar food will be a comfort to your puppy in this new strange place.

Give them room to breathe

Your puppy will love to know that you are close by and there to protect them, but it’s also important to let them explore their new environment and let them know they have a quiet space to go to if they need it.

Create a puppy-proof area

Although the house should be well prepared for your new companion, providing your puppy with a secure room or creating a pen that isn’t around any furniture and safety away from mischief will buy you some much-needed peace of mind.

Keep them entertained

Provide your puppy with new toys to explore, giving them a nice range to play with will make them feel less lonely and will divert their attention away from missing their litter mates.

Be prepared for accidents

Puppies don’t develop real bladder control until they are a few months old. Regardless of previous habits, your house will be a brand new environment and they will need to learn where the boundaries are. Placing puppy pads close to doorways can help to train them to get closer to their outside toilet area.

Introduce other pets slowly

Puppies often have a lot more energy than other household pets. If you have older dogs or cats, it’s a good idea to introduce them slowly and let your puppy get used to the environment before also learning how to behave around less enthusiastic animals.

Following these steps will help to create a smooth first night for you and your puppy.

5 husky facts

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Life with a Siberian Husky is fun, exhilarating and sometimes very, very frustrating.

This can be a challenging breed and they are certainly not the right dog for everyone. A lot of people are drawn to their stunning looks but Siberians are so much more than a pretty face. They are athletes, magicians, acrobats, opera singers, demolition experts and the cheerful slayers of mice, frogs and birdies.

Fact One: They are born to run

Siberians are hard-wired to run and to pull and to be part of a team (even if you are the only other member). It satisfies what is a very basic yearning in them. Rather than fight it, the happiest Siberian owners are the ones who roll with it, and allow their dogs to give them a taste of a life less ordinary, a million miles away from work, bills and the daily grind.

Your husky was born to be a sled dog. He wasn’t born to walk nicely to heel, be an agility star (unless it’s inconveniently of his own choosing – see Fact 3) or be a status symbol. Some of them can, and do, enjoy other activities but these activities have to be carefully tailored to take into account you’re dealing with a sled dog whose ancestors were carefully selected for generations pretty much only to run as far, and as fast, as possible.

You don’t have to head to the tundra or snow covered plains to do this. Happy sled dogs in the UK run on dry land pulling three wheeled rigs (in a team) or a bike or scooter (on their own). Some energetic owners even harness their dogs to themselves and run (cani-cross).

Fact Two: They are interior designers and garden re-modellers.

Siberian Huskies can have their moments of being extremely and randomly destructive. These moments are not always predictable or fathomable. Think six years of perfect behaviour then suddenly you come home to no wallpaper and a pile of sawdust where your coffee table used to be.

Couple this with their fairly unique theory of property ownership and you will often find yourself hunting for one of your shoes in the garden and not always being thrilled with the state it’s in when you find it.

Many huskies take digging to an advanced form a civil engineer would be proud of, and this is not necessarily always done outdoors. A friend’s dog lost his favourite ball underneath the sofa but it was okay as he dug through the cushions and base to retrieve it.

The sled dog determination that enables them to run for miles in challenging environments also makes them so cheerfully determined to overcome obstacles that many people have come home to find husky shaped holes in the interior doors, eaten window frames or whole sections of plaster board removed from partition walls.

Many people put this undesirable behaviour down to boredom or lack of stimulation but it’s equally often just a husky’s pragmatic approach to problem solving.

Fact Three: The Littlest Hobo had nothing on most Siberians

Huskies like to keep one eye on the far horizon and to them, yes, the grass is always greener on the other side of whatever is in their way. This is an advantage when it comes to travelling with your dogs as they are never happier than when being loaded into a vehicle for another exciting road trip but it also gives them an unfortunate degree of dangerous wanderlust.

Off lead activity is never a good idea for Siberians unless they are in a fully enclosed area (although still be careful as to some Siberians “fully enclosed” presumably comes across as some kind of a challenge) and they are quick to take advantage of even the unlikeliest escape route or split second of owner carelessness.

I chased a Siberian around the village in my pyjamas because a 28kg dog squeezed through a hedgehog sized break in the chain link fence. They appear to be able to dislocate their body to do this sort of thing.

You can usually spot the garden of a Siberian owner (and not just because of its moonscape nature and lack of natural lawn). The vast majority of Sibes need maximum security fencing designed, planned and then later reinforced and reinforced again with the understanding that if they do not try to dig under it or barge through it, they will at some point attempt to go over it.

Fact Four: Shed Happens

Most Siberians do not constantly lose bits and pieces of their coats so, yes, the good news is there are occasional times during the year when you can wear black trousers that are not made of leather or plastic.

However, this is more than compensated by the fact most Siberians blow their entire coats out once or twice a year and lose about 16 normal dogs’ worth of the kind of fluff that can penetrate solid objects.

These are the terrible times you eat and breathe dog coat and most of your hot drinks start with picking a stray hair or two off your tongue. Even if your dogs are not allowed upstairs, your bedroom carpet will still be coated in it and your vacuum cleaner has probably burned itself out by this point. I’m far too dogged-up to be even remotely house proud but shedding can reduce even me to tears, especially when you are inexplicably unblocking soggy dog hair out of the plughole (do they even ever go near the sink?).

Like with most things Siberian, there appears to be little rhyme or reason with the shedding, at least to UK resident dogs who we appear to have confused out of any reasonable seasonal coat growth pattern. It is July as I write this and the temperature has been bouncing around the mid to high 20s this past few weeks and I have dogs who are down to their underwear and dogs who have gloriously full coats. The same thing happens in winter.

Fact Five: Maria Callas has Nothing on Them

Huskies are mercurial creatures who can change in seconds from being so utterly standoffish you think you might have offended him, to a wildly, waggy furball who greets you with frantic relief after you’ve been in the shower for five minutes. I think this is largely because anything outside of their sled dog hard wiring (me run, pull, run), they are basically winging.

This consistent inconsistency extends to their vocal abilities. While generally the neighbour’s Jack Russell or Rottie will be 10 times noisier (and definitely more annoying), when a Siberian decides to exercise his vocal chords, you’re going to know about it. While huskies are not overly barky dogs (although they can and do bark at times, especially if unsure about something), they mostly like to sing. Like all amateur karaoke artists, not all of them are particularly good at it. While some produce a soulful, lilting howl, others sound like strangled cats (although in their heads I’m sure they are hearing the melodic call of the wildest wolf). Like wolves, however, Siberians tend to howl to call the pack together. As their pack usually includes you, you might find you’re greeted on the way in from work or sent on your way in the morning by a bit of a sing song.

As well as howling, they can be quite chatty and vocal in other ways. Happy Sibes like to tell you exactly how they are feeling with a wide range of wooing and will often engage in a very animated two way conversation with you.

As their level of excitement rises, so does the pitch. My own dogs are most excited about running and eating. Harnessing these dogs to run sometimes deafens you (thankfully we are in the middle of a forest at those times) and food preparation has to be carried out like a kitchen ninja before they hear a bit of kibble hit a metal dish and start to shriek their anticipation.

The bonus sixth fact is that in spite of all of the above, they will steal your heart. Yes, they might trash your garden, empty your bank account and cut down casual social visits to your home by about 90% but they will definitely and permanently steal your heart.

(This blog has been kindly written by Mel Hannan of Mystic Charoite Racing)

Spotlight on Labradors: why are they so popular?

By | Alpha Feeds | No Comments

Labrador Retrievers…the nation’s most popular breed of retriever. In fact, they are also the most popular breed in the US too! Not only do they make great companions in the home, but they also make excellent guide dogs, therapy dogs, service dogs, and of course gun dogs.

Labradors as gun dogs…

Labrador retrievers are traditionally coloured black, yellow or chocolate brown, and are packed with reactive instincts that make them brilliant working dogs. The primary purpose of a working Labrador is to venture out with its owner and help them during shooting. It is the responsibility of the Labrador to retrieve the shot bird and bring it back to its owner.

Labradors are extremely athletic, and they are naturally gifted swimmers due to their otter-like tails, their webbed feet and their water-resistant double coats. They have strong noses and are very courageous meaning they are a great companion to have with you during shooting season. Labradors are also extremely agile creatures: they are focussed and able to remain alert throughout the entire process. They are extremely intelligent and have a huge desire and willingness to please their owners, making them a perfect gun dog.

Working Labradors have a tough job, and just like us, they need fuel to be able to complete their duties. Alpha Feeds has a vast range of different working dog recipes available to buy, with proteins ranging from 19% to 32% and oils ranging from 8% to 20% ensuring there is a recipe suitable to give your dog the nutrition they need to support you whatever the season.

For any more information on our range of working dog food and your local stockists, click here or get in touch with us on +44(0) 844 800 2234.

Bringing your puppy home for the first time

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So, you’re about ready to bring home your new puppy? This is an exciting time for everyone but remember, it can be extremely overwhelming for your new furry friend, and so it is vital you welcome him to the family very carefully.

Every puppy is different and so may respond differently, but we have put together a small guide on how to manage the first day at home with your new companion, so as to try and make this transition as smooth and positive as possible:

  • It is important to first remember your puppy has just left behind both his mother and his littermates. He is now faced with having to adjust to a new home full of different smells and different faces. He will get used to this, but on his first day, he definitely needs a little time to adjust.
  • Before you bring him into the house, take him outside to his allocated toilet spot and allow him to relieve himself. It is important to immediately begin the toilet training routine as this will help him learn quicker.
  • When you get inside, show him his new home, as after all – this is his new home! Limit this to one or two rooms initially so as not to overwhelm him and remember, you must supervise him. You’ll be amazed at the amount of mischief a puppy can get themselves into. Also, don’t forget to introduce them to their own space, and if possible use a blanket from their old bed to put in their new one so it feels familiar.  Remember, puppies don’t need to be taught when bedtime is, so let them sleep as and when they need to.
  • Remember to check with the breeder/rescue centre what food they have been giving the pup – a change in environment and food could potentially be extremely stressful for your puppy and so it may be best to maintain the diet they are used to, at least for the first week or so.
  • Taking a puppy home for the first time will present all kinds of learning curves, and it will be a journey for you both to learn how to adapt to one another. It may feel impossible on day one, but your puppy will soon become the most loved member of your family! And obviously the most adorable one.

One last thing – don’t forget to enjoy yourself. Getting a new puppy is meant to be fun, and it is absolutely ok to be excited!

If you do need any more information or advice regarding bringing your puppy home for the first time, please get in touch today on +44 (0)844 800 2234.

Alpha Feeds award sponsorship to Chase Ferret Rescue

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In April, leading dog and ferret food brand Alpha Feeds launched a competition on Facebook to win £500 worth of sponsorship.   The competition was open to any dog or ferret-related charity or working group, with the sponsorship being a £500 supply of food for whichever bunch of furry friends they deal with.

Alpha Feeds are delighted to announce that the winner of the competition was Staffordshire based charity Chase Ferret Rescue, with the charity receiving £500 worth of Alpha’s premium ferret food.

Chase Ferret Rescue was founded in 2000 by Angela and Christopher Taylor, with the aim to help ferrets in need, from stray to mistreated, as well as offering boarding services.  Angela has been keeping ferrets since 1998 with the guidance of her father who at the time, had been keeping working ferrets for around 30 years.  As time passed by, they found more and more people in the local area taking ferrets to them for advice and care, so they decided to open Chase Ferret Rescue, a fully-fledged ferret rescue centre.

“Thank you so much for this opportunity,” Angela said upon being informed about her competition win.  “The £500 worth of ferret food will help the rescue centre so much, more than most would imagine.  The money we will save by not having to buy any ferret food for a period of time will help us save for a new run, and then eventually a new shed for our ferrets.  These items can be very expensive, and as we are a charity having the spare funds for these items is very rare.”

Dave Tinker, National Sales Manager for Alpha Feeds said,

“We are very pleased to be able to help an organisation such as Chase Ferret Rescue.  We recognise the incredible work they do for ferrets in their area, and understand that finding funds for improvements in order for them to maintain the high level of work they do is often quite hard for a charity.  The sponsorship we have awarded will hopefully go a long way to help with that.”

A quick guide on how to start ferreting from Simon Whitehead

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Ferreting is an ideal way to harness pest control and catch those pesky rabbits.

It is one of those activities which can be as simple or as complex as you wish it to be, but to begin with we’ll start with a list of basic equipment:

  • A ferret/ferrets (Bred from working ferrets is best for productivity)
  • Spacious housing
  • Food
  • Purse nets/Long nets
  • Ferret locator
  • Spade
  • Ferret carrying box

Ferrets – Everyone has differing views on what makes a good ferret, some prefer hobs others prefer Jills, but either should always be well handled. A ferret doesn’t need to be aggressive in order to do a good job, it just needs to be well socialised and from proven working stock.

Spacious housing – Ferrets are renowned for escaping, so make sure your ferret accommodation is spacious but strong. Well exercised ferrets are happy ferrets.

Food – Our Ferret Feast food is the perfect choice of food for your ferret as it contains a mixture of both protein and vitamins and minerals that are essential for keeping your pet happy and healthy. Read more about our Ferret Feast here.

Nets – Nets are key to catching the rabbits once they have bolted from the warren. There are many available instructions on how to make your own purse net, or you can simply buy them from a reputable net-maker.

Ferret locator – A ferret locator or a ferret finder is a tracking device which attaches to the ferrets neck. This makes sure you don’t lose your ferret when it finds a rabbit hole. It’s good to practice using the locator before you go hunting as well as the responsible actions of using one when required..

Spade – A well designed spade such as The Bulldog Rabbiting Spade, will help you to dig your ferret out if/when required.

These are your essential tools needed to start ferreting.

For any further advice on ferrets or ferreting, or phone us on +44 (0)844 800 2234, we’ll be happy to help.

How to crate train your puppy

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Beginning to crate train your puppy can feel like an impossible task, but it doesn’t have to be. It can take weeks or even months to conquer the crate, but if you stay patient and persevere with it, you will reap the rewards…

The entire premise of buying your puppy a crate is to provide him or her with a safe, secure and positive space that is solely for your pet. This means you should never use the crate as a form of punishment.

Introducing your puppy to the crate

Much in the same way you wouldn’t appreciate being put in a crate without prior warning, your puppy will not like it either. It is important you gradually introduce your puppy to its crate, so as to allow him or her to build up a positive association with it.

Fill the crate with your puppy’s possessions such as its toys and any blankets and start by leaving treats in and around the crate so that your puppy will approach it voluntarily. Make their first impression of the crate a great one! During this initial training stage, never shut the crate door – keep it open at all times so your puppy does not feel restricted or trapped.

Another good way to make your puppy see the crate as a positive experience, is to feed them in the crate. Again, remember not to shut the door at this stage! You do not want to get ahead of yourself and rush the process. Patience is key in crate training.

Shutting the crate door

Once your puppy has built up a positive association with the crate and will go in voluntarily, now is the time to test the waters and try shutting the crate door. Close the door gently and feed your puppy a treat whilst they are inside. Don’t leave them shut inside for any longer than a minute or two at first, slowly increasing this time as you continue to train them.

Make sure you praise your puppy for using their crate, and ensure you leave the door to it open when you are not ‘actively training’ so that your puppy can choose to use it when he or she pleases. This element of freedom with the crate will show your puppy the crate is not to be feared and it will begin to symbolise safety and an area of respite and calm for them.

Don’t forget, crate training can take many months to master. However, eventually you will be able to leave your puppy in its crate for up to four hours at a time during the day and you can even make it his or her sleeping spot too!

Remember…

  • It is a good idea to crate train whilst your pet is still only a puppy as it can be very hard to train an older dog who is not used to confinement in your home.
  • The crate needs to be a sufficient size. It should be big enough for your dog to stand up, turn around and stretch out when lying down.

If you have any more questions about crate training your new puppy, please don’t hesitate to get in touch with Alpha on 0844 800 2234, and one of the team will be more than happy to help you.

What qualities should gundog puppies have?

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When deciding on a gundog for hunting purposes there are many attributes you may want consider.  Here is a run-down of the some of the qualities that you should be looking out for when choosing your dog.

Sensitivity to sound

Some dogs are a lot less shy than others when it comes to noise, which is a huge factor when dealing with firearms in a hunting environment.  This is something to consider when choosing your dog, although bear in mind that sound sensitivity can be improved through training.

Sense of smell

Whatever the purpose of your gundog, whether it be a pointing breed, a flushing dog or a retriever, their sense of smell needs to be exceptional in order to carry out their duties successfully and efficiently.

Jaw Strength

For big game hunting a larger prey, a good strong jaw is a positive attribute.  However, for those who are wishing to hunt birds and smaller prey, a gundog with a soft jaw may do the job just fine. 

Mentality

This is particularly important if your gundog will also be your family dog and general companion.  Although different breeds can vary in temperament, many dogs are naturally relaxed, calm and obedient, which will benefit you in almost all scenarios.

Courageousness

A hunting environment can be a tense place for a regular dog.  The last thing you want when hunting is for your companion to be fearful at a time when you need them to be fearless.  Of course, through spending time with your dog you can influence their behaviour to encourage a cool, calm and low-key approach.  However, those dogs who are naturally courageous are more likely to be able to deal with a wider range of prey.

Endurance

Depending on the type of prey, you may require your hunting dog to pick up the pace at any given moment, and keep up the pace until the job is done.  This quality is particularly important for the longer hunts that require more duration.

Intelligence

Intelligence is a very important factor when training your dog.  Although gundogs are known to have natural abilities that are valuable for hunting, they still need to have a high level of obedience so you can get the most out of your hunting partner.

For any advice on feeding your gundog puppy, email info@alphafeeds.com or phone us on +44 (0)844 800 2234.

working dog

Should I feed my working dog before exercise?

By | Dog Welfare | No Comments

It’s important to recognise that your dog needs to retain a large amount of energy before any intense activity, but you should also be aware that they need sufficient time to digest this meal beforehand.

There is no definitive amount of time to leave your dog to digest their food before beginning an activity, but between one and a half to two hours is recommended.

Dogs can easily ‘bloat’ if they partake in any strenuous exercise too quickly after eating their meal. This may cause the stomach to swell and twist upon itself, causing blockages which can be life threatening to a dog if not treated quickly.

When thinking of your dog’s feeding schedule, it’s always best to keep it consistent, working this effectively around your exercise schedule.

If you’re thinking of feeding your pet after exercise, then this may affect your dog’s performance beforehand. It’s also not a good idea to feed your dog straight after exercise, when they’re excessively warm or when they’re still panting from their workout.

You should wait for at least an hour after exercise before feeding your dog, as this gives them sufficient time to calm down and relax their stomachs before eating a large portion.

Whether you feed your dog before or after exercise, always ensure that fresh, clean water is always available.

For any advice on feeding your working dog, email info@alphafeeds.com or phone us on +44 (0)844 800 2234